DAVID SHENK DATA SMOG PDF

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Data smog refers to an overwhelming amount of data and information — often obtained through an internet search — whose volume serves more to confuse the user than illuminate a topic.

Data smog is a term coined from a book written by the journalist David Shenk, which deals with the influence of the information technology revolution and how the vast amount of information available online make it increasingly difficult to separate facts from fiction. The amount of data available on nearly any topic today is overwhelming, and while it can be advantageous, this constant bombardment can also have side effects that are not unlike air pollution in that they are gradual, insidious and largely invisible.

These include impaired performance and increased stress. Experts have provided tips on how to avoid the effects of data smog. These include:. Toggle navigation Menu. Home Dictionary Tags Technology Trends. Data Smog Last Updated: June 24, Definition - What does Data Smog mean?

Techopedia explains Data Smog The amount of data available on nearly any topic today is overwhelming, and while it can be advantageous, this constant bombardment can also have side effects that are not unlike air pollution in that they are gradual, insidious and largely invisible. Share this:. Related Terms. Related Articles. Mainframes Aren't Dead. Do You Fear Blockchain? Related Questions. How can cloud computing save money? What is the difference between big data and data mining? What is the difference between big data and Hadoop?

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Data Smog: Surviving the Information Glut

It addresses the author's ideas on how the information technology revolution would shape the world, and how the large amount of data available on the Internet would make it more difficult to sift through and separate fact from fiction. According to Data Smog , with the advance of technology , we have been able to progress in terms of society, economy, and even health. Communication is instantaneous, knowledge is abundant, and as humans we try to keep up with this expansion of data that continues to accumulate from around the world. However, it is the overwhelming amount of information that is defined as data smog; "this unexpected, unwelcome part of our atmosphere, an expression for the noxious muck and druck of the Information age.

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David Shenk on Data Smog

Data smog refers to an overwhelming amount of data and information — often obtained through an internet search — whose volume serves more to confuse the user than illuminate a topic. Data smog is a term coined from a book written by the journalist David Shenk, which deals with the influence of the information technology revolution and how the vast amount of information available online make it increasingly difficult to separate facts from fiction. The amount of data available on nearly any topic today is overwhelming, and while it can be advantageous, this constant bombardment can also have side effects that are not unlike air pollution in that they are gradual, insidious and largely invisible. These include impaired performance and increased stress.

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Even our own campus has a special task force focusing on staff workload issues that most of us are all too aware of. In his book, Data Smog, David Shenk, media scholar and Internet enthusiast, suggests that our environment is polluted with too much data — data generated by technology. He sets about describing to us the connection between data escalation and a variety of social and physical ills, including attention deficit disorder, loss of civility, lack of privacy, and even road rage. Shenk includes both anecdotal and statistical citations about unanticipated effects of some technologies. In one example, a woman's fax machine worked too well. She began to notice that "it transmitted information across the country and world so quickly, Now, of course, fax transmission seems hardly zippy at all compared to the rate at which information traverses the Internet.

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